A finished basement is not always the same thing as a designed basement. Sometimes, the basement begins with the basics: walls, a ceiling, lights, and a floor. Gwen Hefner and husband Micah wanted to turn their tiny, airless basement space into a comfortable mancave. They had the basics to start with. The next step, Gwen says, would be a true test to her design skills.


While decorative concrete may cost more than some other types of flooring, its proponents point to the long life expectancy of this material. Even cracks in the floor can be considered an attractive rustic feature as long as they do not reflect structural problems. Those concerned by the slippery nature of high-gloss sealers can add a non-slip additive to sealer or stain before application.
This luxury basement with a wet bar offers extra convenience and accessible utility to this lower level living space. Wall to wall cabinetry with open glass shelving provides a display storage for wines and other liquors. Raised panel base cabinets give lots of additional storage space. The stone fireplace keeps this basement warm and cozy; perfect for entertaining and a great focal point for the area. The stone flooring and matching stone accents on walls and island bar are crafted to create the right balance for this design scheme.

Boys will be boys. This small man-cave basement is fully equipped with the essentials a man would need in his hideaway retreat – a wall dartboard, a bar and a liquor cabinet. Texture painted ceiling in two tone colors and neutral color painted walls are balanced by the medium tone wood stain finish of the cabinetry, doors and bar stools. Wall to wall carpet adds a warmth and welcoming feel to the room.
Across from the sitting area, a home office was constructed using inexpensive IKEA pieces and a painted wood countertop. A 4-inch concrete slab was poured over the existing floor and a stained finish was used to match the wood floors on the main level. A gas fireplace replaces an old woodstove and the existing brick was made light and bright after being covered with plaster and white paint.
If time is critical, consider a basement finishing kit. A finishing kit has insulated wall panels, and some include a walkable flooring surface and ceiling material for DIY installation. Depending on the size of your basement, these kits can be installed in a weekend. However, the floor won't be carpeted, the walls won't be painted, and there will be no electrical or plumbing. Other features such as doors, trim work, and more also need to be added.
4. Interview basement remodeling contractors. You may be tempted to try and save money by managing a basement remodel yourself, but it's most likely worth it to hire a professional. Check affiliations, licensing and referrals and/or reviews from neighbors and friends before interviewing contractors for the final selection to be sure to avoid choosing a bad remodeler. Contractors who specialize in basement remodeling may be better equipped to handle your project.
Are you thinking about finally completing your unfinished basement? While the average basement remodel cost is around $6,500 to $18,500, the return on investment can be up to 69%. That means having a finished basement is not only great for entertaining guests, but it’s also incredibly profitable for you because it’s a home feature buyers want. Here are some basement remodeling ideas to help you get started!
A good lighting plan is key to making your basement an inviting gathering spot. Recessed cans like these create overall illumination as well as task and accent lighting for the bookshelves and artwork. In addition to recessed lights, consider track lights and pendants to eliminate shadows on surfaces where you'll be working, playing, or reading. For an inexpensive basement finishing idea, use table lamps and floor lamps to banish shadows in corners and provide task lighting beside chairs and sofas.
1. Evaluate the space. Be sure to consider potential obstacles to your basement remodel like low ceilings, excessive moisture or ventilation concerns. Determine if your basement needs to be professionally waterproofed before spending tens of thousands of dollars to renovate it as neglecting  to address moisture issues will simply result in expensive damage repairs.
When it comes to basement remodels, the most costly way is to start with bare bones. If all you have is concrete walls and floors, you need to add framing, electrical, plumbing, flooring and trim. Basement finishing in a newer home that already has plumbing and electrical roughed in, a watertight foundation and some insulation installed—but no final finishes (like drywall or paint or carpet)—usually costs less than remodeling an already finished basement. This is because when you already have a finished basement, the pros will need to do demolition at the beginning of the project, which can add $500–$1,500 to overall costs.

Material Costs - In addition to the cost of framing and installing drywall to a basement bathroom, material costs can include: ceiling, flooring, paint, trim, toilet, sink, vanity, all fixtures, tub/shower surround, lighting, and all finishes like towel racks. Plumbing and electrical supplies also factor in to the final budget. Many material costs depend on type of product selected, the brand, and how high-end it is. Heated ceramic floor tiles cost more than basic vinyl tiles.

This luxury basement with a wet bar offers extra convenience and accessible utility to this lower level living space. Wall to wall cabinetry with open glass shelving provides a display storage for wines and other liquors. Raised panel base cabinets give lots of additional storage space. The stone fireplace keeps this basement warm and cozy; perfect for entertaining and a great focal point for the area. The stone flooring and matching stone accents on walls and island bar are crafted to create the right balance for this design scheme.
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