Avoiding Finished Basement Roadblocks This post goes out to all of my fellow d.i.y. basement finishing bosses who are faced with nasty ugly basement obstacles, that are smack in the middle of Basement Progress Avenue. You know what I'm talking about...speed bumps like poles, pipes, wires, beams maybe a furnace or a water heater...you name it...right where you wish they weren't located....
A traditional living room basement with a cool shade of lime color is perfect balance for the neutral shades of brown for the carpet, kitchen cabinetry, exposed beams, window treatment, door and other wooden furniture. The kitchenette is without an island. But has a corner home bar to give way to the large black leather sectional sofa which is perfect for movie night fun.
Wall finishing systems are rapidly gaining in popularity. These systems feature fiberglass panels and pieces of trim that fit into PVC framing. Panels covered in fabric offer an attractive finished appearance to the basement without the work of drywall taping and painting. Advantages include durability, moisture- and fire-resistance and the ability to remove panels for access to water pipes and electrical wiring.

Maybe it’s just great extra space, a blank palette—there are so many awesome ways you can use the basement. A movie room, game room, family room or kitchenette can provide a special place for the family to bond and have fun. Man caves and/or woman caves have become trendy and there are plenty of modern basement cave ideas available to inspire your own private space.
Planning is the first stage with any basement bathroom installation. For a basement that's designed as a recreation room, work space, or kids' play area, a half-bath (stool and sink, but no shower or tub) is adequate. A basement with bedroom or en suite needs a full bathroom. Knowing how you plan to use the basement living space typically dictates the functional purpose of its bathroom.
If time is critical, consider a basement finishing kit. A finishing kit has insulated wall panels, and some include a walkable flooring surface and ceiling material for DIY installation. Depending on the size of your basement, these kits can be installed in a weekend. However, the floor won't be carpeted, the walls won't be painted, and there will be no electrical or plumbing. Other features such as doors, trim work, and more also need to be added.

Because basements are usually below ground level, water seepage and moisture issues have to be resolved before construction can start. Prior to creating a project bid, most contractors will inspect the area to check the interior floor and walls for dampness and make sure the exterior of the foundation is in good shape. Depending on how watertight the basement and foundation are, it may be necessary to protect the basement from future water damage after it’s finished, often through the installation of sump pumps. This work can cost anywhere from $700-$3,000, depending on what needs to be done. Learn more about basement waterproofing. To help prevent moisture problems, homeowners can clear downspouts and gutters of debris to ensure that they help keep moisture away from the foundation.
Wall finishing systems are rapidly gaining in popularity. These systems feature fiberglass panels and pieces of trim that fit into PVC framing. Panels covered in fabric offer an attractive finished appearance to the basement without the work of drywall taping and painting. Advantages include durability, moisture- and fire-resistance and the ability to remove panels for access to water pipes and electrical wiring.
A finished basement has the potential to add value to a home, especially when it comes time for resale. The average basement remodel project can have up to a 70% return on investment. Home buyers typically prefer a house with a finished basement and may even increase their offer if that living space recently has been updated or remodeled. The finished basement also adds value by creating more living space in the home without having to spend thousands on an addition.

What better feature to include in your basement plans than a home theater. Basements often have little to no windows, making the dark space ideal for that movie theater vibe. Raise the floor to add rows of recliners, invest in recessed fixtures with soft lighting you can dim, and swap out large a TV for a projector and screen. Whatever your style may be, there are tons of home theater ideas for you try!
This contemporary basement media room features a living room with comfortable long brown leather couch with tufted ottoman; multiple TV screens are perfect when watching movies on a weekday evening or weekend, or watching your favorite sports live. Components and other things are tucked away in the custom-built cabinets below.  Neutral, monotone colors and layout scheme makes the basement hangout open and bright.
This traditional home basement is redesigned to be an adult’s retreat spot. The game area features a poker table with black leather chairs, the sectional sofa and ottoman by the fire place are made of brown leather and a small counter with bar stools. This entertainment area opens and flows out to the basement’s wine cellar. Decorative stones which are used for accent walls, arch ways and fireplace adds warmth and coziness to the room. Homeowners could entertain many friends in a fun place like this one.
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