Basement remodeling can be stressful, and understandably so. But the styling aspect will provide some much-needed fun. Seeing your newly finished basement take shape as the flooring is installed and the walls painted will be exciting and there is no feeling like seeing it come to life as furniture is put into place and light fixtures are installed.
Across from the sitting area, a home office was constructed using inexpensive IKEA pieces and a painted wood countertop. A 4-inch concrete slab was poured over the existing floor and a stained finish was used to match the wood floors on the main level. A gas fireplace replaces an old woodstove and the existing brick was made light and bright after being covered with plaster and white paint.
Planning is the first stage with any basement bathroom installation. For a basement that's designed as a recreation room, work space, or kids' play area, a half-bath (stool and sink, but no shower or tub) is adequate. A basement with bedroom or en suite needs a full bathroom. Knowing how you plan to use the basement living space typically dictates the functional purpose of its bathroom.

Even if it's currently cold concrete and crammed with boxes of off-season duds, the lowest floor of your home probably has loads of potential. Treat it just as you would any of the rooms aboveground, and it might just become the most popular spot in the house—for a lot less cash than adding on. Here's our bottom-line advice for turning this underutilized space into a place you'll be eager to spend time in.
You have three basic basement ceiling options when refinishing the space. Conceal the joists, pipes, and ductwork with drywall or paneling, hide everything with a suspended or drop ceiling, or leave everything exposed and paint it with a sprayer. Drywall brings the polish of main-level rooms to the basement. Here, light gray paint adds depth to the space and leaves a smooth finish.
A traditional living room basement with a cool shade of lime color is perfect balance for the neutral shades of brown for the carpet, kitchen cabinetry, exposed beams, window treatment, door and other wooden furniture. The kitchenette is without an island. But has a corner home bar to give way to the large black leather sectional sofa which is perfect for movie night fun.

In modern homes, game room are starting to become an essential part of the house. The modern basement game room shown in the image above with mood lighting make this area look just like a high end nightclub. Gorgeous cone pendant lights over the pool table are ideal for a focused lighting which are perfect for the game. A stylish hideout for the man of the house and his friends.
This beautiful luxurious wine cellar basement with dining table is a haven for wine lover homeowners and their guest to enjoy and unwind. This wine cellar innovation is an efficient and proper way to store and keep vintage wine collection. Traditional custom made cabinetry with natural wood finish is the best choice for this wine cellar; it is designed to prevent airborne contaminants to spoil those vintage wines. The coffered ceiling with recessed lights, crystal chandelier and patterned flooring complete the traditional rustic style.
Maybe it’s just great extra space, a blank palette—there are so many awesome ways you can use the basement. A movie room, game room, family room or kitchenette can provide a special place for the family to bond and have fun. Man caves and/or woman caves have become trendy and there are plenty of modern basement cave ideas available to inspire your own private space.
Across from the sitting area, a home office was constructed using inexpensive IKEA pieces and a painted wood countertop. A 4-inch concrete slab was poured over the existing floor and a stained finish was used to match the wood floors on the main level. A gas fireplace replaces an old woodstove and the existing brick was made light and bright after being covered with plaster and white paint.

Basements are ideal for casual social activities for the whole family, or just for the kids. It's the perfect spot for the big screen TV, pool table, and to stash board games and craft supplies. Make this space inviting by finishing and decorating it like any upstairs room. Choose comfortable furnishings that can be easily rearranged to accommodate a few people or a crowd. Incorporate sound systems, internet connections, and good lighting to make the basement design functional.
Estimate the overall cost to install drywall in the basement at approximately $1.50 per square foot. The basic drywall panel measures 8-feet tall and 4-feet wide and is available in thicknesses that range from 1/4" to 5/8". This standard panel usually costs between $10 and $20. Price will vary depending on the brand, panel's thickness, and if it has any special features like mold resistance which may be beneficial for a basement space. Other material costs when adding drywall include the hardware to secure it to the framing, joint tape, and drywall mud.
Elegantly designed finished basement which features an arched entry leading to the home bar is an inspiration for a timeless European style design.  Light tone cabinetry provides more additional storage space.  Granite countertop blends well with the whole color scheme.  Neutral colored patterned ceramic tile flooring works well with the whole design scheme.
If you are going for a movie screening room, then go with a dark neutral, or simply go dark. You want the walls to recede and you don’t want a lot of glare from your projection equipment or tv. Make sure to use a flat paint and paint the ceiling in a dark neutral to prevent light from bouncing around and creating glares. For a classic, old world move theater feeling, go with a rich burgundy or deep navy.
In every basement, it's important to select flooring that stays dry and warm in the winter and cool in the summer. This basement has a yellow birch floor. It's an easy-to-install engineered wood product, which means the flooring is made from several plywood substrates finished with a handsome birch veneer. A rubber floor, similar to those found in gymnasiums, protects the workout area. Beaded board covers the walls.
• Game tables eat up a lot of square footage. For a small pool table (3½ feet by 7 feet), you need a clear space at least 11½ feet wide by 14½ feet long to play comfortably—if you buy the shortest cues, that is. A tournament-size pool table (4½ feet by 9 feet) or a 5-by-9 Ping-Pong table needs even more room. Unless you're positive you'll use it a lot, consider skipping a single-activity table.

A traditional living room basement with a cool shade of lime color is perfect balance for the neutral shades of brown for the carpet, kitchen cabinetry, exposed beams, window treatment, door and other wooden furniture. The kitchenette is without an island. But has a corner home bar to give way to the large black leather sectional sofa which is perfect for movie night fun.
Finishing a basement can cost between $25–$50 per square foot on average, depending on how the basement is finished, whether any challenges come up or whether there are special circumstances with the project. For this reason, a 1,000-square-foot basement can cost up to $50,000 or more to finish. Virgil Miranda of Virgil Miranda’s Construction, a general contracting company based in New Bedford, Massachusetts, says it can be tricky to estimate remodeling jobs based on square footage alone, due to the variance in each job. Larger basements may have a lower cost per square foot than tiny remodel jobs.
Adding or enlarging basement windows and adding exterior doors are jobs for a professional, but the resulting natural light and ventilation will significantly increase your enjoyment of this living space. To add below-ground windows you'll need to dig a window well. The retaining wall for the well may be made of masonry, limestone blocks, or treated landscape timbers, as in this window well. The terraced timbers serve as pot garden perches as well as steps for an emergency exit.

Very disappointed in this episode and the direction the show is headed. If you watch old episodes there is more focus on how things are built or fixed. Also focus on the correct way to do things. This episode skips over all the details of building. It is becoming just another fixerup tv show where you show the before, some shots of work being done, and then the finished project. You need to remember your roots of teaching homeowners the correct way to do things, even if they hire contractors to do the work. Your show has been successful for 40 years because you have always stuck to the same core values. It looks as though you are throwing them away to be just like every other show.

Partitioning your basement into separate rooms transforms it from a storage and utility area to an inviting, warm living space. Framing the basement walls and ceilings makes a tremendous difference in the basement’s appeal. Installing interior walls in a large basement helps to hide expanses of empty space, instantly providing a feeling of coziness. Rooms that can be used for a media room, home office or bedroom will result in extra square footage, increasing the value of the home.


A good lighting plan is key to making your basement an inviting gathering spot. Recessed cans like these create overall illumination as well as task and accent lighting for the bookshelves and artwork. In addition to recessed lights, consider track lights and pendants to eliminate shadows on surfaces where you'll be working, playing, or reading. For an inexpensive basement finishing idea, use table lamps and floor lamps to banish shadows in corners and provide task lighting beside chairs and sofas.

Have a teen that’s tired of sharing a bedroom with a younger sibling? Extended family always staying over? Reconstructing the entire basement into a bedroom will give someone the space, privacy, and comfort they need for a good night’s rest. If you want a spare sleeping area but don’t have the space, creating an alcove with a built-in bed and shelves is great for smaller basements. Just be sure your design plans include enough space for bathroom renovations!


Basement remodeling adds value to your home, increases your useable living space, can protect your foundation from moisture damage, and looks great. Many people remodel a basement to create space for an aging parent or to make room for more children. Another reason for basement remodeling is to create a rentable space that is separate from the rest of your home for a long-term renter or for short-term renting.
Estimate the overall cost to install drywall in the basement at approximately $1.50 per square foot. The basic drywall panel measures 8-feet tall and 4-feet wide and is available in thicknesses that range from 1/4" to 5/8". This standard panel usually costs between $10 and $20. Price will vary depending on the brand, panel's thickness, and if it has any special features like mold resistance which may be beneficial for a basement space. Other material costs when adding drywall include the hardware to secure it to the framing, joint tape, and drywall mud.
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