Avoiding Finished Basement Roadblocks This post goes out to all of my fellow d.i.y. basement finishing bosses who are faced with nasty ugly basement obstacles, that are smack in the middle of Basement Progress Avenue. You know what I'm talking about...speed bumps like poles, pipes, wires, beams maybe a furnace or a water heater...you name it...right where you wish they weren't located....
Old homes may suffer from sagging foundation beams as a result of shifting ground or decay and deterioration of the original building materials. Foundation beams can be raised and shored up successfully, but the right tools, like a pneumatic jack, are essential. Depending on how much the foundation beam must be raised, this job may require several days of incremental steps to complete - which means increased labor costs. Hiring professionals is the best option for this job. Expect costs to run about $10,000 for repairs like a shifted foundation.
Estimate the overall cost to install drywall in the basement at approximately $1.50 per square foot. The basic drywall panel measures 8-feet tall and 4-feet wide and is available in thicknesses that range from 1/4" to 5/8". This standard panel usually costs between $10 and $20. Price will vary depending on the brand, panel's thickness, and if it has any special features like mold resistance which may be beneficial for a basement space. Other material costs when adding drywall include the hardware to secure it to the framing, joint tape, and drywall mud.
The basement can be the perfect place for hobby and craft rooms. Here, a family's love for scrapbooking, model shipbuilding, and togetherness came together in one space. An extra-long counter allows enough space for two people to work. Cabinets constructed using stock drawers provide plenty of storage. Wicker baskets filled with supplies fit right inside a set of open shelves.
Homeowners in search of a warm, professional look for their basements often turn to drywall. Drywall ceilings help the basement look as good as upstairs living areas. Drywall can be treated with a variety of textures that are applied by roller or spray applicator. One difficulty associated with drywall ceilings is the necessity of framing in duct work.
1. Evaluate the space. Be sure to consider potential obstacles to your basement remodel like low ceilings, excessive moisture or ventilation concerns. Determine if your basement needs to be professionally waterproofed before spending tens of thousands of dollars to renovate it as neglecting  to address moisture issues will simply result in expensive damage repairs.
Basement remodeling adds value to your home, increases your useable living space, can protect your foundation from moisture damage, and looks great. Many people remodel a basement to create space for an aging parent or to make room for more children. Another reason for basement remodeling is to create a rentable space that is separate from the rest of your home for a long-term renter or for short-term renting.
You already have stairs to the basement, but when you're doing basement renovations, make sure they meet code and look good. If they're not in a convenient location, consider moving them to a better spot. Codes vary with staircase configurations and baluster shape, so you'll need to talk to the building inspector about your plans. It's also a good idea to consult an architect or other design professional for help in designing a staircase that works well with your other plans for the space.
Basement walls are the perfect opportunity for you to get creative! Mixed wood walls are a budget-friendly option that will give your space a cabin-like feel. And charcoal stones, brick, or tile are great basement wall ideas if you want to experiment with texture. But if you’re not ready to make any drastic changes, a neutral paint color and colorful crown molding will do the trick!
A basement provides plenty of room to make a workout room tailored to your interests. Carve out space to build that sauna you’ve always wanted, or use multiple floor types to divide up workout stations, such as wood floors for yoga and carpet for cool-down stretches. Rubber mats are an affordable basement flooring option—not to mention, a smart way to protect the ground from heavy equipment.

Installing a bathroom in a basement costs more than installing a bathroom above ground. Costs can range from $2,500 to $5,000 on average, depending on the number of fixtures and whether the plumbing must be installed from scratch or if it’s roughed in already. Basement plumbing requires special considerations to ensure proper drainage and tie-in with the main sewer line, which may not be deep enough to allow the basement bathroom plumbing to use gravity the way above-ground plumbing does. Virgil Miranda’s Construction subcontracts all plumbing work. Miranda says that sometimes the toilet alone in a basement can cost up to $2,500 because sometimes homeowners need to invest in a toilet that does not use gravity but instead a macerating function to grind waste down to prevent clogging. Miranda estimates that each bathroom fixture in a basement costs $800–$900 on average, so a full, three-piece bath could cost $3,000 for the fixtures alone. Adding a kitchenette or wet bar sink adds more to overall refinishing costs. In addition, some basements require a French drain with one or more sump pumps, which can cost up to $10,000 on average, depending on how much ground the drain covers.
Plumbing - Check locally for required permits and any zoning law regulations about adding in plumbing, or whenever working with septic and sewer lines. Planning your basement bathroom directly below or close to the pipes of an existing bathroom may help reduce the overall labor and costs. Remember that all drainage lines require a downhill slope to sluice away waste water. If this isn't possible, a sewage injection pump must be installed. An approximate cost of these pumps ranges from $150-$3,000.
A traditional living room basement with a cool shade of lime color is perfect balance for the neutral shades of brown for the carpet, kitchen cabinetry, exposed beams, window treatment, door and other wooden furniture. The kitchenette is without an island. But has a corner home bar to give way to the large black leather sectional sofa which is perfect for movie night fun.
The basement can be the perfect place for hobby and craft rooms. Here, a family's love for scrapbooking, model shipbuilding, and togetherness came together in one space. An extra-long counter allows enough space for two people to work. Cabinets constructed using stock drawers provide plenty of storage. Wicker baskets filled with supplies fit right inside a set of open shelves.
If you are going for a movie screening room, then go with a dark neutral, or simply go dark. You want the walls to recede and you don’t want a lot of glare from your projection equipment or tv. Make sure to use a flat paint and paint the ceiling in a dark neutral to prevent light from bouncing around and creating glares. For a classic, old world move theater feeling, go with a rich burgundy or deep navy.

Avoiding Finished Basement Roadblocks This post goes out to all of my fellow d.i.y. basement finishing bosses who are faced with nasty ugly basement obstacles, that are smack in the middle of Basement Progress Avenue. You know what I'm talking about...speed bumps like poles, pipes, wires, beams maybe a furnace or a water heater...you name it...right where you wish they weren't located....
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