The basement can be the perfect place for hobby and craft rooms. Here, a family's love for scrapbooking, model shipbuilding, and togetherness came together in one space. An extra-long counter allows enough space for two people to work. Cabinets constructed using stock drawers provide plenty of storage. Wicker baskets filled with supplies fit right inside a set of open shelves.
There is no shortage of modern basement ideas to borrow from. Unused basements tend to get filled with every old and unwanted item in the house from worn out furniture to childhood memorabilia. Unfortunately, this is letting precious square footage go to waste. The basement is a perfect space that could be transformed into a warm and welcoming area for your family and friends to enjoy.
An unfinished basement serves as a valuable blank canvas. The finishing process begins with basics such as hanging and painting drywall and installing plywood floors at a relatively low cost. Basement finishing means taking a space that currently is not livable and transforming it into a space you can use and enjoy. In an unfinished space, there may be nothing but a concrete floor, exposed pipes and electrical, and no walls or only the barest of wall framework in place. On average, the cost to refinish will fall anywhere between $6,500 to $18,500, or more for larger spaces.
Avoiding Finished Basement Roadblocks This post goes out to all of my fellow d.i.y. basement finishing bosses who are faced with nasty ugly basement obstacles, that are smack in the middle of Basement Progress Avenue. You know what I'm talking about...speed bumps like poles, pipes, wires, beams maybe a furnace or a water heater...you name it...right where you wish they weren't located.... 

Unless you install a plywood subfloor, your basement floor is likely to be a concrete slab. Fortunately, concrete accepts most common flooring choices, from paint to vinyl, laminate, tile, and carpet. Most solid wood flooring is not recommended for below-grade installations, however, because it shrinks and expands, resulting in gaps or warping. Engineered wood is a good alternative because it shrinks and expands a little less.
Even if it's currently cold concrete and crammed with boxes of off-season duds, the lowest floor of your home probably has loads of potential. Treat it just as you would any of the rooms aboveground, and it might just become the most popular spot in the house—for a lot less cash than adding on. Here's our bottom-line advice for turning this underutilized space into a place you'll be eager to spend time in.
Bedrooms – A common strategy is to set up a couple of extra bedrooms in the basement for guests. This is especially beneficial for families that love to entertain on a regular basis. You can easily have guests stay over without disrupting the family space above. Basement bedrooms can also come in handy if you have older kids that cannot share bedrooms any more. Plus, you could also add a small kitchenette and bathroom for convenience.
In choosing the best décor for the basement, try to create some sense of continuity with the rest of the house. Start by creating an open stairwell leading from the rest of the house. It makes the basement feel open, lighter and connected to your home. Next, make sure that anyone descending the stairwell isn’t jarred by the contrast in décor with the space above. As much as you need to create defining styles for different sections of the basement, ensure there is a flow from the décor above to the one below. Otherwise, your basement is going to feel like some far off disconnected place and not part of your home.

The stair railing and post installation was a fairly simple project, and required little more than wood glue and a finish nailer. If you're installing a railing in a remodel such as this, plan ahead. If you have large furniture or other items to move into your new space, be sure hold off on installing stair railings, and other structures that might be in the way, until the large furniture items have been brought in.


There are no hard and fast rules about wall color in a basement, but there are ways to make your color look it’s best in a space that often has no natural light. Ensure that your lighting is in place and adequate before deciding on a color, determine what the space will be used for, and consider the tone that you want to set for the space. Your basement is one of the few truly personal spaces in a home, make it yours!
Linoleum is another environmentally friendly flooring option for basements. Homeowners looking for numerous design options and ease of maintenance will enjoy linoleum. Drawbacks include a tendency to stain because of its porous nature and a lack of warmth under the feet. This flooring material is durable, but when damage does occur, repairs can be difficult.

This contemporary basement design has several entertainment areas such as pool game area, granite home bar and more than a few seating areas are perfect for accommodating different interests and activities giving this game room personal charm and style. Modern drop lights combined with recessed lighting provides ample illumination to the whole area.
Stucco can be applied directly to cinderblocks, and the process is fairly easy. Since masonry walls are strong, a support system is not required. All that is needed is application of a concrete bonding agent. Traditional application requires a scratch coat, brown coat and finish coat. Advantages of stucco include the unique patterns and textures that can be created to add interest to the basement space. The material is durable and able to accept numerous colors.
Whether your basement is for a game room, man cave, yoga retreat, or movie room, this room has the potential to be the best room in the house. What color you chose depends on a few things, the most important being what is the tone that you want to set for the room? Followed closely by how the room will be used and who will be using it most. The color is really going to set the stage for this space so you want to make sure you have the right color before you commit it to your walls.
Homeowners wishing to enclose basement appliances should take note of air-supply requirements for both the furnace and water heater, which are powered by electricity or natural gas, oil or propane. Fuel-burning appliances use room air for combustion and require an unrestricted air supply. Any enclosure requires installation of a louvered door between living areas and the furnace room to ensure an adequate air supply and ventilation in your basement. Without sufficient air, a house may fill with dangerous gases, including carbon monoxide or radon.
Last year I bought a house that had the stainless steel micro model installed. The house was surrounded by 80’ tall Maples & Birch. TONS OF LEAVES.Yes, it the micro mesh keeps all leaf and seeds out of the gutter 100%. What the manf and dealers won’t tell you is that you must clean the mesh 2x’s a year to get spring pollen, mold, & fall leaf dust off. Otherwise it will eventually keep EVERYTHING out, including WATER. Major ice problems flowing over the gutters. No it was not the result of ice damming. I removed it all & just deal with the leaves 3x’s each fall.Got ranch home with easy access to the gutters - get the micro mesh. Easier to clean that than clean gunk out of the gutter.hire a young buck to climb a ladder. A whole lot cheaper.
Your foundation should be inspected prior to finishing your basement. You don’t want to cover up any structural damage that would be identified in an inspection by installing framing and drywall. If items such as pipes have rust, the problem may be humidity instead of a leak, but it can be just as damaging. Waterproofing the basement and using a dehumidifier helps reduce dampness and the risk of mold development.
When it comes to basement renovation, the national average price for a finished basement ranges between $5,000-$70,000. That said, unless you're adding in an elaborate home theater or building in separate rooms with high-end finishes, most Thumbtack customers report paying, on average, between $5,100-$7,150 for their remodeled basement. A finished basement provides you additional living space, increases your home’s value, and offers great return on investment when it comes to home improvement projects.
Your basement will likely need to be fitted with additional wires to support more lights and electronics. You will need to hire a licensed electrician if you plan to install additional overhead light fixtures, outlets and other components that require additional wiring. The cost of electrical installations depends on the exact project, but licensed electricians tend to charge between $50 and $100 per hour.
4. Interview basement remodeling contractors. You may be tempted to try and save money by managing a basement remodel yourself, but it's most likely worth it to hire a professional. Check affiliations, licensing and referrals and/or reviews from neighbors and friends before interviewing contractors for the final selection to be sure to avoid choosing a bad remodeler. Contractors who specialize in basement remodeling may be better equipped to handle your project.
Any project involving electrical, plumbing, or turning the basement into a livable space, requires permits. Plumbing must be done to code for proper drainage to avoid health issues. It also has to ensure flushing certain waste back into the sewer. Electrical issues can cause short-circuits, blown breakers, and fires. The chance of something happening increases if installation is not done properly from the start, including acquiring the proper permits. If creating a bedroom or other regular living space, permits are required. Emergency escape avenues (for fire and other emergencies) need to be in place as well.

Any project involving electrical, plumbing, or turning the basement into a livable space, requires permits. Plumbing must be done to code for proper drainage to avoid health issues. It also has to ensure flushing certain waste back into the sewer. Electrical issues can cause short-circuits, blown breakers, and fires. The chance of something happening increases if installation is not done properly from the start, including acquiring the proper permits. If creating a bedroom or other regular living space, permits are required. Emergency escape avenues (for fire and other emergencies) need to be in place as well.


Before you even consider color, you want to have lighting in the space figured out. If you don’t have any natural light, how are you going to brighten up the space? Will you use pot lights or track lighting, will you supplement with floor and table lamps? Your paint will look worlds different if you change your lighting after you paint, so try to sort out your lighting needs first.


Basement walls are the perfect opportunity for you to get creative! Mixed wood walls are a budget-friendly option that will give your space a cabin-like feel. And charcoal stones, brick, or tile are great basement wall ideas if you want to experiment with texture. But if you’re not ready to make any drastic changes, a neutral paint color and colorful crown molding will do the trick!
After your new bathroom is complete, or you have remodeled an existing space, get it inspected to ensure all plumbing and electrical installation are done correctly. If your bathroom needs to be installed from the ground up, expect to pay somewhere between $6,000 and $15,000 for the entire project. If your basement is already finished but does not yet have the necessary plumbing for a bathroom in the space, you can expect to pay between $200 - $500 to hire a plumber.
Wine requires proper storage, and transforming basements into wine cellar is putting this extra living space of your house in to good use. Choose wood which are good in quality having resistance to rot and decay, durable and requires only a mineral oil finish; such as redwood, mahogany, walnut or cypress. Stone floors are the excellent flooring system you can install for your basement wine cellars because they are strong and durable. Granite countertop is a good combination as well.
So you have decided to turn your musty junk-filled basement into a warm liveable space. Or maybe you are already using the basement but want to style it up a notch. Basement design ideas are limitless. Whether you want a cool chic look or a more dramatic themed basement, the choices are endless. But before you decide on the style you want for your new finished basement, here are a few things to consider.
A finished basement is not always the same thing as a designed basement. Sometimes, the basement begins with the basics: walls, a ceiling, lights, and a floor. Gwen Hefner and husband Micah wanted to turn their tiny, airless basement space into a comfortable mancave. They had the basics to start with. The next step, Gwen says, would be a true test to her design skills.
The average cost of basement remodeling varies based on the square footage of the basement space, if structural changes are needed, and if you are adding in elements such as electrical work for a kitchenette or plumbing for a half bath. Other factors in cost include whether you have design plans already and what work you want done on the finishes such as trim and flooring. Here’s a breakdown of the various cost factors.

Visitors can find comfort and refuge in this basement thanks to an added guest suite just off the family room. Two closets offer an unexpected amount of storage in this small space and create a cozy alcove for the bed. A high ledge acts as a headboard and display area, and two space-saving wall scones light the nook. The bed faces French doors that, like the family room, take in backyard views.
When it comes to basement remodels, the most costly way is to start with bare bones. If all you have is concrete walls and floors, you need to add framing, electrical, plumbing, flooring and trim. Basement finishing in a newer home that already has plumbing and electrical roughed in, a watertight foundation and some insulation installed—but no final finishes (like drywall or paint or carpet)—usually costs less than remodeling an already finished basement. This is because when you already have a finished basement, the pros will need to do demolition at the beginning of the project, which can add $500–$1,500 to overall costs.
Estimate the overall cost to install drywall in the basement at approximately $1.50 per square foot. The basic drywall panel measures 8-feet tall and 4-feet wide and is available in thicknesses that range from 1/4" to 5/8". This standard panel usually costs between $10 and $20. Price will vary depending on the brand, panel's thickness, and if it has any special features like mold resistance which may be beneficial for a basement space. Other material costs when adding drywall include the hardware to secure it to the framing, joint tape, and drywall mud.
×