A basement bedroom and full or half bath makes an ideal suite for guests or teens. Think about who will sleep in the basement and the amenities they'll need to help you determine the best dimensions for this basement remodeling idea. To comfortably fit a double bed, you'll need a room with a minimum of 125 square feet. If twin beds will serve your needs better, plan on at least 150 square feet. Building codes also require that basement bedrooms have an emergency exit that leads directly outside, either through a door or a window.
First, what are you using your basement for? This will greatly determine what finish you give the basement. A living area needs to feel warm and cozy, a bedroom needs to have a quiet and relaxing finish and a game room needs some exciting colors. There are plenty of websites offering basement finishing ideas you can borrow. We have our own list below that you can use as a starting point. Find a style that pleases you and adapt it to fit your finished basement.
Even if it's currently cold concrete and crammed with boxes of off-season duds, the lowest floor of your home probably has loads of potential. Treat it just as you would any of the rooms aboveground, and it might just become the most popular spot in the house—for a lot less cash than adding on. Here's our bottom-line advice for turning this underutilized space into a place you'll be eager to spend time in.
First, what are you using your basement for? This will greatly determine what finish you give the basement. A living area needs to feel warm and cozy, a bedroom needs to have a quiet and relaxing finish and a game room needs some exciting colors. There are plenty of websites offering basement finishing ideas you can borrow. We have our own list below that you can use as a starting point. Find a style that pleases you and adapt it to fit your finished basement.
A finished basement is not always the same thing as a designed basement. Sometimes, the basement begins with the basics: walls, a ceiling, lights, and a floor. Gwen Hefner and husband Micah wanted to turn their tiny, airless basement space into a comfortable mancave. They had the basics to start with. The next step, Gwen says, would be a true test to her design skills.
Even if it's currently cold concrete and crammed with boxes of off-season duds, the lowest floor of your home probably has loads of potential. Treat it just as you would any of the rooms aboveground, and it might just become the most popular spot in the house—for a lot less cash than adding on. Here's our bottom-line advice for turning this underutilized space into a place you'll be eager to spend time in.
In choosing the best décor for the basement, try to create some sense of continuity with the rest of the house. Start by creating an open stairwell leading from the rest of the house. It makes the basement feel open, lighter and connected to your home. Next, make sure that anyone descending the stairwell isn’t jarred by the contrast in décor with the space above. As much as you need to create defining styles for different sections of the basement, ensure there is a flow from the décor above to the one below. Otherwise, your basement is going to feel like some far off disconnected place and not part of your home.
Planning is the first stage with any basement bathroom installation. For a basement that's designed as a recreation room, work space, or kids' play area, a half-bath (stool and sink, but no shower or tub) is adequate. A basement with bedroom or en suite needs a full bathroom. Knowing how you plan to use the basement living space typically dictates the functional purpose of its bathroom.
There are several types of basement remodeling depending on the outcomes you want. Whether you have nothing but damp concrete walls and floors or you have a finished basement with painted walls, a pool table and a wet bar will determine the scope of work for your basement remodel and the cost. Here are some common basement remodeling projects that homeowners take on and their related costs.
Old homes may suffer from sagging foundation beams as a result of shifting ground or decay and deterioration of the original building materials. Foundation beams can be raised and shored up successfully, but the right tools, like a pneumatic jack, are essential. Depending on how much the foundation beam must be raised, this job may require several days of incremental steps to complete - which means increased labor costs. Hiring professionals is the best option for this job. Expect costs to run about $10,000 for repairs like a shifted foundation.
Visitors can find comfort and refuge in this basement thanks to an added guest suite just off the family room. Two closets offer an unexpected amount of storage in this small space and create a cozy alcove for the bed. A high ledge acts as a headboard and display area, and two space-saving wall scones light the nook. The bed faces French doors that, like the family room, take in backyard views.

Have a teen that’s tired of sharing a bedroom with a younger sibling? Extended family always staying over? Reconstructing the entire basement into a bedroom will give someone the space, privacy, and comfort they need for a good night’s rest. If you want a spare sleeping area but don’t have the space, creating an alcove with a built-in bed and shelves is great for smaller basements. Just be sure your design plans include enough space for bathroom renovations!


Any project involving electrical, plumbing, or turning the basement into a livable space, requires permits. Plumbing must be done to code for proper drainage to avoid health issues. It also has to ensure flushing certain waste back into the sewer. Electrical issues can cause short-circuits, blown breakers, and fires. The chance of something happening increases if installation is not done properly from the start, including acquiring the proper permits. If creating a bedroom or other regular living space, permits are required. Emergency escape avenues (for fire and other emergencies) need to be in place as well.
In every basement, it's important to select flooring that stays dry and warm in the winter and cool in the summer. This basement has a yellow birch floor. It's an easy-to-install engineered wood product, which means the flooring is made from several plywood substrates finished with a handsome birch veneer. A rubber floor, similar to those found in gymnasiums, protects the workout area. Beaded board covers the walls.
Basement remodeling can be stressful, and understandably so. But the styling aspect will provide some much-needed fun. Seeing your newly finished basement take shape as the flooring is installed and the walls painted will be exciting and there is no feeling like seeing it come to life as furniture is put into place and light fixtures are installed.
accessories apartment art asian bathroom beach house bedroom colorful contemporary courtyard decor eclectic floor plans furniture grey hi-tech home office hotel house tour industrial japan kids room kitchen lighting living room loft Luxury minimalist modern office russia rustic scandinavian small space studio taiwan tech-office thailand ukraine usa villa wall decor white wood interior workspace

Homeowners wishing to enclose basement appliances should take note of air-supply requirements for both the furnace and water heater, which are powered by electricity or natural gas, oil or propane. Fuel-burning appliances use room air for combustion and require an unrestricted air supply. Any enclosure requires installation of a louvered door between living areas and the furnace room to ensure an adequate air supply and ventilation in your basement. Without sufficient air, a house may fill with dangerous gases, including carbon monoxide or radon.
Basement remodeling adds value to your home, increases your useable living space, can protect your foundation from moisture damage, and looks great. Many people remodel a basement to create space for an aging parent or to make room for more children. Another reason for basement remodeling is to create a rentable space that is separate from the rest of your home for a long-term renter or for short-term renting.
Even if you do not use an online tool, plan extensively beforehand as to exactly what you plan to do. What color will the wall be? Will you put in any art? What flooring style will you go for? If your budget allows, you can consult an interior designer for recommendations. One advantage of such planning is that it allows you to set out a budget that you can work within, ensuring that you are not caught short of cash in the middle of your project.
Cork is an eco-friendly flooring material that can be installed over an existing floor or concrete. Cork is derived from the bark of the cork tree, meaning trees are not cut down during harvesting. Cork flooring is durable and has good insulating qualities, but if you choose cork flooring for your basement, make sure you choose a type that is recommended for a basement environment as not all cork flooring is appropriate for basements.

Your stairs are the first thing guests will see when they walk down into your finished basement. Give them something to talk about with a staircase that’s one of a kind. Create suspended steps, light-up steps, or glass side panels. Or make smaller changes by installing patterned carpet, decorative tiles, or a unique railing. Looking for more cool staircase designs? Check out these under the stairs ideas!
Create a restful retreat with a cottage inspired basement with a built-in wood bench and a cozy bed nook. Cool neutral color scheme of tan, pale blue, cream and white combined with minimal furnishings gives this area a warm and welcoming ambiance. For small finished bedroom ideas a built in bench that can be converted in to a bed with under cabinet storage is a great space saver and can increase the home’s value.
×